Prescribing Advice for GPs

An NHS Prescribing Advisers' Blog

Corgard discontinued

The manufacturer of nadolol (Corgard®) has confirmed that this product has been discontinued. The product has been discontinued for commercial reasons.

Nadolol, a beta blocker, is licensed for use in hypertension, angina, arrhythmias, migraine prophylaxis and adjunctive treatment of thyrotoxicosis. Supply chain stock will be limited and there is no generic alternative. Treatment should not be stopped abruptly and therefore patients who are currently being prescribed nadolol should be identified, reviewed offered an appropriate alternative.

Action: Clinicians should be aware of this product being discontinued. It would be prudent to run clinical system searches to identify any patients who are currently prescribed this product to allow a review and an alternative to be arranged.

Update: As of June 2018 it would seem that the manufacturer reversed the decision to discontinue Corgard® and the 80mg tablets remain available and in the supply chain.

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68 Comments to “Corgard discontinued”

  1. Can I take 40 mg morning 40 mg evening instead of 80 mg morning?
    Would it work the same?
    Thanks a lot

    Comment by Chrissoula Vangelatou — February 7, 2021 #
    Reply

    1. @Chrissoula Vangelatou,

      Yes, you can split the dose and take 40mg twice daily, it should have no effect on the efficacy of the medication looking at the quote half-life of the drug in the body.

      Comment by Matthew Robinson — February 7, 2021 #
      Reply

  2. Nadolol gives me diarrhoea, upset stomach and numbness in my hands at night. Is there a substitute out there for me to take?

    Comment by Phillip Allen — February 1, 2021 #
    Reply

    1. @Phillip Allen,

      There are plenty of other drugs in the group - beta-blockers, that you can try. And depending on what you are taking it for there may well be other alternative medicines that are not beta-blockers that might be suitable. Speak you your doctor about the options.

      Comment by Matthew Robinson — February 2, 2021 #
      Reply

  3. So as of Feb 2021 nadalol is still available. I've been taking it since 1977. My doctor at Kaiser never said a word they are or might discontinue it.

    Comment by Edward Roman — February 1, 2021 #
    Reply

    1. @Edward,

      As noted above, the manufacturer announced they had reversed their decision to discontinue this medication in June 2018.

      Comment by Matthew Robinson — February 1, 2021 #
      Reply

  4. I've used nadalol for about 20 years. It is the only medication that controls my sinus tachycardia. They have tried to wean me off nadalol but my heart rate goes up to 160 bpm or more which brings on chest pain, shortness of breath, HTN and usually a visit to the ER and possible hospital admission. Nadalol controls my sinus tachycardia, my blood pressure, my angina and my essential tremors. One medication takes care of 4 issues. I have been tried on other medications but don't tolerate the side effects or they don't control all of my issues and I have to take additional medications. Please do not stop making nadalol! It works so well with no side effects for me!

    Comment by Nancy Byington — August 15, 2020 #
    Reply

    1. @Nancy Byington,

      I made an update on the post above in June 2018 when I learned that the manufacturer had revered the decision to discontinue nadolol.

      Comment by Matthew Robinson — August 15, 2020 #
      Reply

  5. I’ve used Corgard and nadalol for 40 years. I have found that not all generic brands have the same effects. Cipla and Sandoz repeatedly cause bouts of supraventricular tachycardia and push me into atrial fibrillation. Mylan seems to work well but I have problems securing it. I've been told by Walgreens and CFS that they can't get it.

    Comment by Dan D — February 15, 2020 #
    Reply

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